SONG OF THE DAY Al Duncan – Bawana Jinde


R-8261272-1458164391-6935.jpegA while ago I stumbled upon a website called The Exotica Project (one hundred dreamland 45’s), a venture created to explore a somewhat disparate collection of one hundred exotic-themed 45s through the motifs that unite them.  The website is well worth checking out, covering anything from jazz, Latin, surf-guitar, African percussion, R&B and much more.

I shared this site with another and he has recently unearthed this scorcher ( as he so aptly put it) thanks to The Exotica Project!  Released in 1962, Bawana Jinde is the b-side Al Duncan’s, Cossak Walk and is an instrumental track heavily orchestrated by tons of glorious, crazed percussion..so as you can imagine, this is just what I love!

The Youtube video I am featuring in this post has been uploaded by the creator of the great Exotica Project and he has included an extensive write-up about the track.  So instead of me revamping or repeating his words, I have quoted him below:

“From 1962, a wild, wailing blast of percussive instrumental R&B that doesn’t let up.  Al Duncan was a drummer, and though allmusic.com claims otherwise, I’m almost certain “Bawana Jinde” was in fact the handiwork of Chicago’s prolific session drummer of the same name. Duncan was part of an informal house band for Vee-Jay Records but he recorded for other Chicago institutions like Chess and Cobra Records, and his prodigious sessionography in the world of ‘50s and ‘60s blues, R&B, gospel, rock ‘n’ roll and jazz included everyone from Jimmy Reed and John Lee Hooker to the Dells, Dale Hawkins and the Staple Singers. “Bawana Jinde” was one of a clutch of 45s Duncan recorded for Stacy Records, a small Chicago indie perhaps best remembered for its releases by West Coast guitarist Al Casey. To my limited knowledge, “Bawana Jinde” doesn’t seem to mean too much as a title; perhaps Duncan was inspired by “Baba Jinde” by Nigerian drummer Babatunde Olatunji, whose influential Drums of Passion album brought African music to a larger American audience in the late ‘50s. For more exotica gems, see the Exotica Project, One Hundred Dreamland 45s: http://exoticaproject.com/”

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